A Travellerspoint blog

Tanzania

Heating up the EFE Symposium in Dar es Salaam

NSCC International's Jim Bate attends on behalf of the EFE Veta-Mikumi project

Greetings from sunny Tanzania. After travelling for 26 hours I am happy to be back in Tanzania for another wonderful opportunity. I am currently enjoying the EFE-Tanzania Symposium being held at the White Sands Resort, just outside of Dar es Salaam. There are about 60 representatives from all 12 Canadian projects making up the Education for Employment program sponsored by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and administered through the Association of Canadian Community Colleges (ACCC). Christopher Ayo, Ludovic Saronga and I are here representing the VETA – Mikumi project. The first day was a great experience for me and I am learning a great deal about this program and some of the challenges it faces. There are people from industry, government and the education sector all working toward a common goal of getting more of the people in Tanzania trained in vocational and technical areas in order for them to obtain jobs. It is great to see so many people working together to make this program succeed.

Jim Bate, NSCC International

Posted by NSCC Intl 10:25 Archived in Tanzania Comments (0)

Sonya's Blog

International Service Learning Program, Health and Human Services 2011

When I first stepped off the plane and handed my passport over to the customs officer behind the glass window it hit me, I am in Africa, Tanzania, Africa. The heat was unreal, we were sweating in minutes, and loving every minute of it. The smells were/are more prominent in the city of Dar, the things you wish you knew what the smell was, to “I hope I never smell it again”.No matter where you look, no matter how small the space there is something there. There isn’t a free spot if you needed it. Through the business of the streets and the fastest traffic I could ever imagine, there is a peacefulness that can only be contributed to the amazing people of Tanzania. The people of Tanzania have a way of making a 27 year old mother of two who has never traveled outside of Canada feel as though she could have been here for years. We have had many experiences learning from the Kimara Peer Educators how one small grass roots NGO can do so much. No matter how I think to describe this experience of a lifetime – really there are no words – it just leaves us saying “ya know. …”. But until you have been here and smelled the smells, tasted the local cuisine and shook hands with the strangers on the street you just can’t really get how “WOW” this experience is.

Sonya Janes-Carroll
Non-Profit Leadership
Kingstec Campus

Posted by NSCC Intl 03:16 Archived in Tanzania Comments (1)

Kristy's Blog

International Service Learning Program, Health and Human Services 2011

After months of anticipation and preparation for my Africa trip, I thought once I step on the ground reality will kick in. However, it has been the exact opposite. I have been eating local food, learning, hearing and speaking Swahili and absorbing the culture, but at the end of the day it is all like a dream. I am amazed by everything in Tanzania. The people, the place, the food, the smell and the feelings I have about it all. Even though we are “wazungus” people have welcomed us with open arms and whole hearts. Language is no barrier here. Even though we can’t speak Swahili, and some of the Tanzanians can’t speak much English, we are still able to communicate and connect with each other. This is an incredible experience that I will never ever forget!

Kristy Normore
Human Services
Marconi Campus

Posted by NSCC Intl 03:13 Archived in Tanzania Comments (1)

Mike's Blog

International Service Learning Program, Health and Human Services 2011

Being the only male in the group this year, I feel I have a lot of responsibility while here. Besides being given nicknames that I won’t mention, being picked at and being handed the bill everywhere I go, I have really been able to see the difference with how a male is treated here in Tanzania. For example, when a server or someone at a store wants to speak to someone in our group I am often approached first. If we are in a restaurant the server will often ask me if we are ready to order. It would appear to anyone that I am the leader of the group and I am running the show. I assure you, that is not at all true ☺ . Normally at home I manage to keep my manliness at bay, but here I am on a rollercoaster of emotions and I am not afraid to admit it. The things I have seen have shocked me, made me laugh, gave me goose bumps/chills, made me happy, made me sad, gave me pride, and although I try to appear macho, I have also shed some tears at the end of some days. Tanzania is an incredible country, and at home (I have come to realize), there are too many false perceptions and stigmas surrounding what Africa is. Tanzania is the most incredible place I have ever been and I will always recommend it to others, as well as to continue to share my experiences. This place has truly changed my life and my perceptions of life forever. If you are ever “thinking” about going to Tanzania or another African country someday, STOP thinking and START planning to come here. It may be the absolutely best choice you have ever made.

Mike Shea
Human Services, Waterfront Campus

Posted by NSCC Intl 03:09 Archived in Tanzania Comments (1)

Kerry's Blog

International Service Learning Program, Health and Human Services 2011

I said to myself , “once we get to Switzerland it surely will feel like I am going. . .” Seven hours later, after sitting in the Zurich airport for what felt like days, I said to myself “once we land in Nairobi, it surely will feel like I am going. . .” Another eight hours later the excitement is building as we are the only (ones) left on the plane, but still I say to myself, “once we land in Dar es Salaam it will have to feel like I am there!” It is now Monday at 4:42pm Dar time, I have been in Africa for almost 48 hours and I have only just said “It’s unbelievable, I am in Dar es Salaam Africa.” Around 21 hours (not including time change), two sunrises in less than 24 hours, only three hours of darkness in one night, only two and a half hours of sleep, a tour of the Village Museum, amazing food, incredible dancing and music, wonderful people, and our first trip to see the Kimara Peer Educators, I finally feel like we are here and that this really is not a dream, or a clip from a movie. I have never felt so welcomed or seen so many smiling people so proud to have us visit their beautiful country. The people of Tanzania have already captured a piece of my heart. I know this was the chance of a lifetime for me and I know Tanzania will hold a place in my heart forever and it’s only day two. I can’t wait to see what adventures will unfold for us next. I am making friends and memories that will stay with me the rest of my lifetime.

Kerry Marshall
Human Services, Burridge Campus

Posted by NSCC Intl 06:54 Archived in Tanzania Comments (1)

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